Refractive Eye Conditions

Refractive Eye Conditions

Nearsightedness or Myopia

The eye doctors at Duquette Family Eye Care offer diagnosis and treatment of nearsightedness or myopia for patients of all ages. Nearsightedness (aka myopia) is a common refractive vision problem that results most often from the axial length of the eye being too long and/or the curvature of the cornea being too steep. This results in light and images being focused in front of the retina. A patient who has nearsightedness or myopia typically has difficulty seeing things at distance with this type of common refractive eye problem.

Farsightedness or Hyperopia

The eye doctors at Duquette Family Eye Care offer diagnosis and treatment of farsightedness (aka hyperopia) for patients of all ages. Farsightedness or hyperopia is a common refractive vision problem that results most often from the axial length of the eye being too short and/or the curvature of the Cornea being too flat. This results in light and images being focused behind the Retina. A patient who has Farsightedness or hyperopia typically has difficulty focusing, especially up close, as well as using digital devices, with this type of common refractive eye problem.

Astigmatism

The eye doctors at Duquette Family Eye Care offer diagnosis and treatment of astigmatism for all patients. Astigmatism is a common refractive vision problem that results most often from an unequal curvature of the cornea. The curvature of a normal cornea is uniform and typically has the shape of a basketball-that is, it is round or spherical. A patient who has astigmatism has a cornea that is typically shaped like a football-that is, it has two different curvatures. This results in light being focused on the retina, or the back of the eye, in two different directions. When light focuses in this manner it can cause blurring or distorted vision to occur. Depending on the location and orientation of the different curvatures in the cornea, it can result in differing types of blurring and distortion.

Presbyopia

The eye doctors at Duquette Family Eye Care offer diagnosis and treatment of Presbyopia, an age related near vision focusing problem. Presbyopia is an aging phenomenon that occurs as the crystalline lens loses its flexibility. Presbyopia begins at around age 40 and progresses until about age 65. From birth, until approximately the age of 40, the crystalline lens is both crystal clear” and quite soft and flexible. This flexibility allows the crystalline lens to change its shape and alter its curvature in order to rapidly focus your vision at various distances-from far, to near, to arm’s length, to far or near again. The focusing capacity of the crystalline lens gives you the ability to see things at all distances-a process called accommodation.

About the time that we enter our 40s, the crystalline lens begins to stiffen. The stiffening of the crystalline lens makes it progressively more difficult to change focus or accommodate, making it more and more difficult to see close up. Initially, this reduces our ability to see objects clearly close up. As Presbyopia progresses it becomes more difficult to see reading material or objects at arm’s length as well as at computer distance. When this loss of flexibility occurs, it is called Presbyopia or old eyes.

As you begin to experience Presbyopia, patients often tell us that their “arms are too short” requiring them to see up close by moving near objects and reading material farther away in order to bring them into focus and to see them clearly. It is important to know that Presbyopia affects everyone including those who have cataracts. As Presbyopia begins, people who have never worn eyeglasses find that they need reading glasses or multifocal glasses or bifocals in order to read and see up close. People who already wear glasses may need bifocals or progressives in order to see up close and have comfortable near vision.